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When the government plays with hidden taxes, we all lose

By · March 30th, 2014

“You don’t get nuthin for nuthin.” Professor Stephen King discusses the illusion and the reality of cross-subsidies, and who really bears the costs of the postal service, the gas reservation scheme and the NBN.

The dynamic force of internet piracy

By · March 29th, 2014

The free access to film and television is slowly becoming the social norm. Annie Cao uncovers the game-changing effects of internet piracy that have changed the landscape of the industry.

The Great Recession that we dodged

By · March 28th, 2014

In his ESSA debut, Brody Viney counts Australia’s lucky stars as other nations remain fraught with fiscal uncertainty.

Driving to a new era of economic growth

By · March 27th, 2014

With many exciting technologies well on their way, Robert Greco singles out the driverless car and canvasses the economic benefits the economy could expect from its arrival.

The Economic Man 2.0

By · March 26th, 2014

Cynthia Huang examines the link between technology and economics. Can gadgets enhance human rationality?

The minimum wage debate

By · March 26th, 2014

Why would you raise the minimum wage? Chandan Hegde weighs in on the economic dilemma playing out in the U.S.

Capitalism in Crisis: Income Inequality in the US

By · March 25th, 2014

Marco Madzzar analyses the US post-GFC and explains the concerning trends of growing income inequality that the US faces.

Self-managed super funds: a blessing or a bomb?

By · March 22nd, 2014

Yannis Goutzamanis examines the dangers of the unregulated use of self-managed super funds, and how it could undermine the entire public policy rationale behind superannuation.

The secret to East Asian modernisation

By · March 21st, 2014

Both market-based and centrally planned economies went down the inevitable path of industrialisation during the 20th century. Emily Vuong reflects on the unique experiences of Japan and China.

Markets and morality

By · March 20th, 2014

First the free market. Then Enron. Then the GFC. Is the market inherently immoral?

Banking on luck: are prize-linked bank accounts the perfect product for non-savers?

By · March 19th, 2014

Philip O’Riordan examines the economic rationale behind prize-linked savings accounts.

Book Review: The Great Escape

By · March 18th, 2014

Matthew Vethecan explores Angus Deaton’s new book, The Great Escape, which tells the story of how most of mankind’s escape to affluence has left some behind, and what we should do to help.

Is the Co-op Bookshop providing value for its members?

By · March 17th, 2014

Monopolies so often get away with price gouging their customers. Examples are all around us and one particular instance seems to go beyond simply prices. Lachlan Walden investigates.

City upon a Hill

By · March 15th, 2014

Elijah discusses the Puritan settlement of New England and how it was the ideal environment for the development of a new secular, capitalist ethic.

A brief history of China’s ‘hukou’ system – Part 1

By · March 14th, 2014

This first instalment in Alice He’s series enlightens readers on a system of geographical division and hence inequality that exists in China today.

D-Day for debt restructuring

By · March 13th, 2014

A radical interpretation of a standard debt clause by the New York Courts threatens to undermine sovereign debt restructuring worldwide.

The Murray Inquiry: what it may mean for Australia’s banking landscape

By · March 12th, 2014

Stephanie Gale explains the Federal Government’s inquiry into the banking system, including its terms of reference, reactions and its potential to change Australia’s banking environment as we know it.

For first year university students studying commerce

By · March 12th, 2014

Dr Mike Pottenger explains the utility of the skills to be learned from the compulsory first-year statistics unit, in the context of a zombie apocalypse.

Central command and five year plans: Soviet industrialisation under Stalin

By · March 10th, 2014

Joey Moloney tells the story of Joseph Stalin’s attempts at rapid industrialisation in the pre-World War II era.

What price is the history of economics?

By · March 7th, 2014

John Lodewijks details the benefits of learning about economic history and its importance to the success of economists, present and future.

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