regulation

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Lessons learnt from the GFC and how to heed them

The Global Financial Crisis highlighted the shortcomings of the financial sector and its exposure to risk. Fuelled by the failures of financial regulators, governments and central banks, many lessons can be learnt from the GFC.

This article first appeared in Short Supply 2017 – check out the full magazine via the Short Supply tab at the top of this page!

The problems (and promise) of microfinance

Just three decades ago, billions of people around the world were stuck in a trap. Faced with low incomes on the one hand and exploitative loan sharks the other, they could neither save for the future nor purchase the capital required to generate a living. This changed with the pioneering work of Mohammad Yunus in Bangladesh, and with the establishment of the Grameen Bank in 1983, microfinance was born. 

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Self-managed super funds: a blessing or a bomb?

I remember sitting in a finance lecture on superannuation, presumably paying little attention, until the lecturer suddenly decided to embark upon a tangential rant. Being an avid listener of talkback radio on the long drives to and from Monash University, Clayton, I had acquired a taste for the rhetorical art-form commonly known as ‘the rant’. I listened keenly.

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Competition and the law – economically sound, or theoretically patchy?

If you look across today’s media, discussion about the level of modern competition appears to be everywhere. Headed by Coles and Woolworths, Australians are slowly seeing numerous facets of their everyday lives taken over by the large conglomerates – petrol, insurance, let alone the (decreasing number of) brands that can be physically purchased when heading to the supermarket.

An interesting question for consideration, at least in my view, is how our legal and enforcement systems actually deal with changes in competition, and how ‘economic’ their motives behind their decisions really are. How does the judiciary impose law onto what would otherwise be the free market – and, for those of us with a piqued interest in the subject, where do economic advisers fit in?

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John Freebairn Lecture recap

On Thursday the 19th of September the University of Melbourne hosted the inaugural John Freebairn lecture titled ‘Governing the ungovernable: the market, technology and you’, presented by Professor Stephen King from Monash University. I had the opportunity to attend what was an insightful lecture about how the growing complexity, pace of change and use of technology has brought about a conundrum for market regulators. Stephen King’s speech was broken up into three parts: how regulation has adapted in the context of new technology, how some of the old rules will need remaking as technology has changed many business models, and finally regulating big data and the information revolution.  This article will provide a recap of the lecture for those who could not attend the event.

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How to regulate a legal cannabis market

In what had before seemed a distant future for pro-cannabis legalisation advocates, cannabis will soon be legally traded in recreational pot shops as a market good.

The passing of Amendment 64 to the Colorado Constitution last November allows U.S. states to create their own laws regulating marijuana production and consumption within sanction of the federal law.

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