book review

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Book Review: Digital Gold by Nathaniel Popper

Want to learn more about the engrossing history of Bitcoin? Join Hooi San Ng as she gives her verdict on the book ‘Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money’.

Good economics for hard times by Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo

“What is dangerous is not making mistakes, but to be so enamored of one’s point of view that one does not let facts get in the way. To make progress, we have to constantly go back to the facts, acknowledge our errors, and move on.” With this in mind, continue reading for this week’s book review on “Good Economics for Hard Times” by Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo.

The captured economy by Brink Lindsey and Steven M. Teles

There’s a lot to be learned about economics beyond lecture halls, journals and the news. Books can provide a holistic, sometimes radically different, perspective on the role of economics. What can we learn from these books? With our new weekly book review, ESSA intends to find out. This time, read on for our review of: The Captured Economy

Thinking, fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman

There’s a lot to be learned about economics beyond lecture halls, journals and the news. Books can provide a holistic, sometimes radically different, perspective on the role of economics. What can we learn from these books? With our new weekly book review, ESSA intends to find out. This time, read on for our review of: Thinking, Fast and Slow.

Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

There’s a lot to be learned about economics beyond lecture halls, journals and the news. Books can provide a holistic, sometimes radically different, perspective on the role of economics. What can we learn from these books? With our new weekly book review, ESSA intends to find out. Read on for our review of: Sapiens

Book Review: Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner

There’s a lot to be learned about economics beyond lecture halls, journals and the news. Books can provide a holistic, sometimes radically different, perspective on the role of economics. What can we learn from these books? With our new weekly book review, ESSA intends to find out. Read on for our review of the first book: Freakonomics

Book Review: The Great Escape

The past two and a half centuries have witnessed the largest and most spectacular increase in human wellbeing in history. Economies accounting for the majority of the world’s population have grown exponentially, supporting rapid population expansions while raising material living standards. At the same time, life expectancy in most parts of the world has soared. A child born in sub-Saharan Africa today is more likely to live to the age of five than a child born in the UK just a century ago.

Angus Deaton, an economist at Princeton, gives a broad overview of both of these dimensions of progress, telling the intertwined stories of the economic and medical progress that have shaped the modern world. His thesis is largely positive: mankind has made significant progress raising its wellbeing.

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The Great Deformation

David Stockman’s ‘The Great Deformation’: doomsday ramblings or insightful criticism of modern financial systems? Hungy reads to find out.