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O-WEEK WITH MELBOURNE

Join us at Melbourne O-Week this Wednesday and Thursday where you can sign up as a member and keep an eye on our incredible range of events and opportunities!

O-WEEK WITH MONASH

Join us at Monash O-Week at D14 where you can sign up as a member and keep an eye on our incredible range of events and opportunities!

Lessons of congestion from the Goldman Sachs

A recent Business Insider article detailed how the Goldman Sachs managed to solve the long tolerated issue of lunchtime cafeteria crowding (unrelated humour-plenty Goldman Sachs video).  The analysts at the Goldman Sachs had identified that during the typical midday hunger-period of 11:30am to 1:30pm, the cafeteria was crowded, lines for food collection were long and stagnant, and for the average Goldmanite this was an inefficient use of their time.

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Opening the front door wider

The Comprehensive Plan of Action for Indochinese Refugees (CPA) has been praised for upholding ‘international solidarity’ and responding to what was the burgeoning refugee crisis of 1989.[1] It has also been criticised for its execution, with critics arguing that it is an example of international buck-passing and questionable compromises. Regardless, the CPA has since affirmed itself as a practical model that allowed policy makers to combine humanitarian principles of compassion with political pragmatism.

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Spain’s tax on sunlight – the candle makers’ tax?

In the mid-2000’s Spain embarked on a solar power revolution: 2008 alone saw solar-energy capacity increase by 400%, accounting for half of the world’s new solar-power installations[i]. Yet five years on, many of Spain’s solar-energy companies are on the verge of bankruptcy as revenues and demand plummet. What happened to cause such a rapid fall from grace in the industry once dubbed ‘renewable-energy’s Cinderella’[ii]?

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AusAID: why Australia and the world’s poorest need it

On September 18 Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced the government’s decision to effectively abolish AusAID by integrating it into the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). He cited ‘confused responsibilities, duplication and waste’ as reasons for the merger, and suggested that now the ‘aid and diplomatic arms of Australia’s international policy agenda are to be more closely aligned’. The decision elicited a concerned response from NGOs and others involved in the aid sector, who defend the existence of AusAID on the grounds that foreign policy and development issues are not the same thing, and should not be treated as such.

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Social media, social capital and… lolcats?

As my first year statistics students can tell you, I’m not much of a gambling man. But if you’re reading this, I’m willing to bet you use social media. I’d even guess most of you only found this post because of social media. So let me ask you this. Is social media a blessing or a curse? Does it boost or cripple productivity?

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