ESSA

ESSA
  1. The Economics Student Society of Australia
  2. Annual Publication Out Now!
    By · May 20th, 2017

    Enjoy our annual publications below!

  3. Mo Money Mo Problems: The Universal Basic Income
    By · August 22nd, 2016

    Ahead of tonight’s big debate between Melbourne and Monash, Matt Lagamba weighs in on the universal basic income.

The development of monetary policy – Part 1

By · April 19th, 2019

With the housing market slowing and wages stagnating, political pundits are calling for the RBA to cut rates, but what is the meaning behind these ideas? Conor Yung looks at the genesis of ideas on monetary policy to give you the context behind the business jargon.

To license or not to license

By · April 12th, 2019

Licensing advocates will likely tell you that occupational licensing protects public interest. So why have there been recent calls for the abolition of occupational licensing? Jessica Tang explores.

The Universal Basic Income – legitimate policy or far-off pipe dream?

By · April 11th, 2019

The idea of a Universal Basic Income is emerging from the wilderness and is now firmly in the political spotlight, but is it really the blessing it claims to be? Chris Craig explores.

No Man is an Island – How Climate Change is Aggravating Economic Inequality

By · April 3rd, 2019

Carbon emissions have global, but uneven, consequences. Sarsha Crawley explores how climate change is exacerbating multidimensional economic inequality.

Inequality, tax and the budget – part 1

By · March 29th, 2019

Income distribution, infrastructure spending and the tax-welfare system. Miguel Ayala explores what we can expect from the 2019 federal budget.

How subjective is it?

By · March 27th, 2019

When asked, economists generally acknowledge that individual preferences differ from person to person, but it seems very easy to forget. Mitchell Harvey questions whether we take subjectivism seriously.

An Unconventional Policy

By · March 22nd, 2019

Unlike Keynes in 1936, technology means that we are no longer restricted to the assumption that cash cannot bear interest. Lemia Bickalo explores unconventional monetary policy in the modern age.

Does private health insurance take pressure off the public health system?

By · March 20th, 2019

The government spends $6 billion a year on rebates for private health insurance. Thao-Mi Bui investigates if such hefty expenditure is worth it.

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